Open Source Musings

opensource

Many people believe that getting organized involves a calendar, a todo list, or some arcane and complex mix of software. That's one way to do the deed. It's effective, but it's not the most efficient way of doing things.

Instead, why not put everything under one roof? Or, in this case, into a single terminal window. How? By using a dashboard.

System administrators, DevOps engineers, and developers use dashboards to keep on top of what they need to keep on top of. Dashboards do that by breaking information into discrete chunks and displaying those chunks in their own spaces on screen. All that information is available at a glance and it's easy to understand.

A dashboard isn't just for the techie. Even if you have 10 thumbs when it comes to things technical, you can benefit from using a dashboard. I'm one of those folks with 10 thumbs, and I find dashboards to be very useful.

While I'm not a fan of its name, I am definitely a fan of what WTF does and how it does it. And that's display a lot of different information in a way that's clear and easy to follow.

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Does the world need another mobile operating system? Canonical, the company that develops and markets Ubuntu, thought so. In 2015, Canonical released Ubuntu Touch, the mobile version of its popular desktop Linux distribution.

The idea was to create an alternative to iOS and Android. An alternative that was completely free and open source, and which was not only secure but also respected the privacy of its users.

That experiment lasted for about two years. Ubuntu Touch was available for a few smartphones and a tablet, but the market wasn't growing in the way Canonical had hoped. In April, 2017 Canonical announced it was pulling the plug on its creation.

Ubuntu Touch looked like it was going the way of Palm's version of webOS. However, during its short life a small yet dedicated and passionate community grew around the operating system. And, in true open source fashion, that community came together to rescue Ubuntu Touch.

Via EtherPad, I chatted with Dalton Durst, one of the two full-time developers with the project. He walked me through the origins of the UBports project, took me down the often bumpy road it travelled to get where it is, and discussed where the project is going.

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