Open Source Musings

terminal

Here's the latest in an irregular series of short posts that teach some Linux command line basics that you might not know or may have forgotten.

While I keep saying that you don't need to use the command line in order to use Linux, knowing a few basic commands can be a useful.

Take, for example, times when you have a folder on your hard drive packed with files. Hands up if you don't have at least one. Yeah, I thought so. Me, too.

How do you effectively and efficiently view the files in a directory? And how do you pinpoint the files that you want to see? By using the ls command, of course.

Let's take a look at some of the ways in which you can use ls.

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(Note: This post was first published, in a slightly different form, at Opensource.com and appears here via a CC BY-SA 4.0 license).

One perception that Linux can't seem to shake off is that you can't do anything without using the command line. A number of people in my circle have been using Linux effectively for years, and they've yet to crack open a terminal window.

Having said that, working at the command line can make certain tasks faster and more efficient. If you’re using older hardware, command line tools are an excellent alternative to graphical applications since they don't use too many resources.

One of those tasks playing music. You can do that in a terminal. How? Here’s a look at three command line music players.

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(This post was first published at Opensource.com and appears here via a CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.)

We all want our passwords to be safe and secure. To do that, many people turn to password management applications like KeePassXC or Bitwarden.

If you spend a lot of time in a terminal window and are looking for a simpler solution, you'll want to check out one of the many password managers for the Linux command line. They're quick, easy to use, and secure.

Let's take a look at three of them.

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One of the great things about the command line is that you can do just about anything there that you can do within a graphical environment like GNOME, KDE, xfce, OpenBox, or whatever window manager you use. Sometimes, you can do it faster and more efficiently.

One of the tasks I do at the command line is renaming and deleting both files and folders. That's often because I've converted or combined files and need to change their names or get rid of the ones that I don't need any longer.

There are three commands that let me do that quickly and easily. Let's take a look at how to use them.

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