Open Source Musings

Focusing on Linux and open source, with a decidedly non-techie slant

(Note: This post was first published, in a slightly different form, at Opensource.com and appears here via a CC-BY-SA 4.0 licence.)

I've had a soft spot for Elementary OS since I first encountered it in 2013. A lot of that has to do with the distribution being very clean and simple.

Since 2013, I've recommended Elementary to people who I've helped transition to Linux from other operating systems. Some have stuck with it. Some who moved on to other Linux distributions told me that Elementary helped smooth the transition and gave them more confidence using Linux.

Like the distribution itself, many applications created specifically for Elementary OS are simple, clean, and useful. They can help boost your day-to-day productivity, too.

Let's take a look at five of those apps.

Read more...

Over the years, I've read a lot about how Linux on the desktop is dead or dying. About how Linux hasn't been gaining any traction on computers used ... well, used everywhere and by everyone. I've even heard more than a few people muse whether or not Linux is ready for the desktop.

To be honest, I don't care about all those gloom and doom prognostications.

Why?

As I've been saying for a long time, Linux is ready for my desktop. It has been since the turn of the century. Using Linux and various pieces of free and open source software, I can do everything that I want and need to do on a computer. Write and publish? Definitely. Work with graphics? No problem. Play music and video? As long as there's no DRM, all is better than good. Use the web? Obviously ...

And, no, I only have to use the command line if I want to. I do every so often, but that's another story.

For me, Linux just works. More to the point, it lets me work. It's that simple. The experiences of others, the utterances of journalists and pundits, and the disbelief of people around me using Windows and Apple products don't matter to me. What matters are my experiences and how Linux works for me.

Scott Nesbitt

#linux #desktop #opinion

Many people believe that getting organized involves a calendar, a todo list, or some arcane and complex mix of software. That's one way to do the deed. It's effective, but it's not the most efficient way of doing things.

Instead, why not put everything under one roof? Or, in this case, into a single terminal window. How? By using a dashboard.

System administrators, DevOps engineers, and developers use dashboards to keep on top of what they need to keep on top of. Dashboards do that by breaking information into discrete chunks and displaying those chunks in their own spaces on screen. All that information is available at a glance and it's easy to understand.

A dashboard isn't just for the techie. Even if you have 10 thumbs when it comes to things technical, you can benefit from using a dashboard. I'm one of those folks with 10 thumbs, and I find dashboards to be very useful.

While I'm not a fan of its name, I am definitely a fan of what WTF does and how it does it. And that's display a lot of different information in a way that's clear and easy to follow.

Read more...

(Note: This article was first published at Opensource.com and appears here via a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.)

Unless your a coder, a system administrator, or a DevOps person, that editor doesn't need to be bristling with functions and functions. A lightweight text editor is more than enough for most people.

Choices abound. You can use the editor that's baked into your Linux distribution or you can go with one of these lightweight text editors.

Read more...

(Note: This article was first published, in a slightly different form, at Opensource.com and appears here via a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.)

Just about everyone I know takes notes, and many people use an online note-taking application like Evernote or Google Keep. Those are all good tools, but you have to wonder about the security and privacy of your information — especially in light of Evernote's great privacy flip-flop of 2016. If you want more control over your notes and your data, you really need to turn to an open source tool.

Whatever your reasons for moving away from one of the popular web-based note-taking applications, there are plain text alternatives out there. Let's look at one of those alternatives: Turtl.

Read more...

Back in the days when I used Windows, one of the applications that I relied on was Paint Shop Pro. It wasn't just a powerful image editor. It also had a built-in screen capture function. Professionally, that was very useful.

Of course, Paint Shop Pro isn't available for Linux. And, anyway, I think Corel (the company that sells it) has really bloated Paint Shop Pro in an attempt to turn it into a rival to Photoshop.

I regularly use one of a handful of screen capture utilities on the Linux desktop. Every so often, I find myself pulling those images into The GIMP to edit them. But since The GIMP has its own screen capture function, I can cut out the middle man whenever I need to.

To take a screenshot, fire up The GIMP. From the File menu, choose Create and then click Screenshot to open the Screenshot dialog.

Getting ready to take a screenshot with The GIMP

You can choose to take a screenshot of:

  • A single window
  • The entire screen
  • A region on the screen or on a window

You can also set a delay (in seconds) before grabbing the screen. When you're ready, click the Snap button. If you chose to:

  • Take a screenshot of a single window, click on that window
  • Grab a region of a screen or window, click and drag to select the region

After a moment, the screenshot appears in The GIMP.

Editing a screenshot taken with The GIMP

From there, you can manipulate the image as you need and then export it to a file. Easy, no?

Scott Nesbitt

#linux #desktop #apps

Once upon a time, my websites originated from a couple of well-known hosting providers. During those years, I regularly needed to log into the servers that hosted my web sites to change or upload a file. For the longest time, I did that using FTP, but stopped because the passwords are sent in plaintext. Wasn't that reason enough?

While I often used FileZilla for secure connections, it was overkill when I needed to change or transfer one file. Instead, I turned to the command line and used SSH and SCP. Both offered me a level of security that FTP didn't. Why? They create an encrypted connection with a server — no plaintext is allowed.

Let's take a quick look at SSH and SCP.

Note: This post isn't a comprehensive guide to SSH and SCP. It's a quick and dirty introduction for someone with few technical skills. What you read here will help get you going. You can get more information from a number of sources, including this one.

Read more...

Enter your email to subscribe to updates.